Featured Post

Sassy Peach Goes to Kindergarten: Happy 5th Birthday!

Wow! We made it! Half a decade! That's crazy talk. I said to a friend the other day how much I couldn't believe how far I've com...

Monday, August 24, 2015

Rarity from the Hollow: A Novel

Rarity from the Hollow by Robert Eggleton caught my eye when the author himself told me about where he sends the proceeds for this book. I will tell you more about it below, and if you are even remotely interested in this book, I want to urge you to consider purchasing it and reading it. 

Lacy Dawn lives in Appalachia with her worn-out mom, her Iraq War disabled dad, and her mutt Brownie. Lacy Dawn's android boyfriend, DotCom, has come to the hollow with a mission. His equipment includes infomercial videos of Earth's earliest proto-humans from millennia ago. DotCom has been sent by the Manager of the Mall on planet Shptiludrp: he must recruit Lacy Dawn to save the Universe in exchange for the designation of Earth as a planet which is eligible for continued existence within a universal economic structure that exploits underdeveloped planets for their mineral content. Lacy Dawn’s magic enables her to save the universe, Earth, and, most importantly, her own family. 

This book was absolutely fascinating, and it was heartbreaking to boot. Lacy Dawn is such an interesting young lady, and I found the early pages when she was working with her best friend to prepare for a spelling test to be so telling of her character. She is a bit of a loner, but a very special girl. Her healing gifts were bestowed on her classmates, and her best friend idolizes her. She is dependent on DotCom for help herself, and when she is called upon to help save the universe, her willingness to use her gifts for good was interesting to watch and follow. As you read this book though, you have to keep in mind the world in which Lacy Dawn lives. It's not an easy life, being a daughter of Appalachia, and growing up with not much more than a box to play in. I was incredibly struck when she describes the death of a classmate at the hands of her father -- it has stayed with me long after putting this book down. 

Dark and humorous at times, this book reached for absurdity in its plot to teach a deeper lesson about childhood and when children have to deal with adult circumstances. No child should have to save the world, just like no child should have to deal with the death of her childhood friends and her father's mental illness. It's a story that holds meaning if you let it come to you. 

Author proceeds have been donated to Children’s Home Society of West Virginia where the author worked in the early 1980s: Children’s Home Society Of West Virginia. It's a private, non-profit child welfare agency caring for more than 13,000 children, youth, and families throughout the state of West Virginia each year. The list of the services they provide is incredible, and well worth your support.

For purchase below.

No comments:

Post a Comment