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Thursday, May 18, 2017

A Rose for Her Grave and Other True Cases: Ann Rule's Crime Files Vol. 1

Reader's of this blog will know why I am so excited about today's post: Ann Rule's A Rose for Her Grave and Other True Cases: Ann Rule's Crime Files Vol. 1. I have done Volumes 2, 3, and 4, but I have been on the hunt for Vol. 1 for a while. I would like to post on these in order, so this was a fun find for me.

The main title story features Randy Roth, a man who wants to be a victim and claim as much cash as possible. His first wife is MIA, his second wife died after falling off a cliff, his third wife ran for the hills after one of the most frightening rafting experiences I've ever heard (with Randy at the helm), and his fourth wife drowned in a -- guess what? -- rafting accident at a lake. The man had nine insurance claims between the deaths and "robberies" at his home and at those of friends he knew, and he wasn't exactly father of the year either. All of this leads up to one cold-hearted snake who managed to charm single mothers and get away with murder.

Other stories in this volume include murder and mayhem at its finest, because sometimes you know your killer, and sometimes you don't. I'm still stuck on the Roth murder, because I finished it most recently. Although the short story "Molly's Murder" sticks with me as well. It's the story of a young ambitious woman, living on her own, who was just too kind to her neighbor without knowing that he was a disturbed man. I shudder to think about all those years I lived alone.

Back to Roth and his departed wives. It's a fascinating story, one of a man who has no care for anyone -- woman or child, especially his own -- and a story that has no satisfying backstory. We never find out why Roth is so cruel to his own child. We do know that his father left his mother, and that his brother killed someone (no more details in order to not ruin the course of the story), but none of that in and of itself explains why Roth went to great lengths to torture his child and his stepchildren when they weren't perfect. It also doesn't explain why he hated women to the extent that he did. He would woo them and be an attentive lover at first, and then he would abandon all pretense once the marriage license was signed. What a fascinating character, and brought to life by the precision that Ann Rule brings to all of her true crime retellings. 

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