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Wednesday, June 21, 2017

Guest Blogger Charlotte: Go Ask Alice

Hey!

Okay, I'm going to start with the summary of my review. Go Ask Alice is amazing. Why? Because it's so incredibly bad.

Go Ask Alice was published in 1971. It claims to be the true story of a teenage girl's drug use that has been edited by a group of editors, and I started reading it under this impression. The cover says it's written by "Anonymous", and the inside cover mentions that it is a true diary.

I will admit that at the beginning of the book, I thought it felt slightly formal and the language didn't sound like any teenager I know or have ever met, but I thought that may be because it was written in the 1960s. After all, I certainly wouldn't be excited to wear a white pantsuit to a party, or bring a Jell-O salad, or set my hair by curling it on orange juice cans, but my parents assured me that these things (which are all mentioned in the book) are actual things that teenagers might have done. (Is this how my hypothetical kids will feel about things I do now? Maybe they'll think eating sushi and writing book reviews is unfathomable.)

So I tried to get lost in the story, but I just found it so unbelievable that I started reading about the book instead of reading the book itself. As it turns out, it's not only fiction, but fiction thought to have been written by a Mormon counselor as a way to present the dangers of drug use. Maybe I'm the last person to know this.

But now things started to make sense. Moments in the plot that seemed outrageous and unbelievable (and that frankly would have succeeded in shocking me if they'd been real) made sense as the wild fear-mongering of someone who seemed to have no idea what drug use is like. Admittedly I don't either, but I'm pretty sure most people don't accidentally swallow LSD in a Coke at a party and end up casually shooting heroin a day later. The narrator so quickly and so casually goes from worrying about a B on a paper to living as a homeless prostitute. Even weirder, she seems to hesitate between the two with seemingly no transition!

She's also so straightforward in what's happened that it doesn't sound like a diary at all. Fresh from reading The Diary of Anne Frank, I found that I kept asking, "Is this really supposed to be a diary?"

This is basically what the book sounds like:

Dear Diary,

Today was so terrible! I accidentally snagged a fingernail on my bed, and mother will be so frustrated with me! It makes me wish I was dead! Maybe instead I'll find some cocaine and sniff it and then shoot more drugs into my veins and ruin my life. I think it would be super-fun! I will try to do that as long as it won't make me miss the Sock Hop on Saturday, because I long to wear my velvet dress with the lace collar - it's peachy! But if I have to prostitute myself or sell my family to get the extra-fun drugs, I'll do it, because drugs have lured me in and ruined my life even though I'm a great girl with parents who love me. Oh Diary!

Once you know that this book is written by an adult pretending to write the true story of a teenage girl, it's actually amazing to read. And if you didn't know from this review, or by the story overall, you'd know from sentences like this one:

“Adolescents have a very rocky insecure time. Grown-ups treat them like children and yet expect them to act like adults. They give them orders like little animals, then expect them to react like mature, and always rational, self-assured persons of legal stature. It is a difficult, lost, vacillating time.”

Oh yes, that's a real line from the book. A real line that this author wanted us to think a teenager wrote in her private journal. Although this made me very much want a tee shirt that says "Adolescents have a very rocky insecure time", (haha) I can't imagine how this line made the cut. Who knows. Maybe it was a difficult, lost, vacillating time for the editor.


- Charlotte 

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